Learn More About the Artist and the Project...

Matthew Lloyd Otto (2008) Photo: Carly Otto

THE ARTIST: "I bought my first guitar at age 14 (1989), and I started my first band, 2nd Home, a year later. Band practices were always at my house, and it was also where the other band members stored their instruments. I could hear entire songs in my head, so at age 15 (1990) I bought a Tascam 4-track cassette recorder so I could record music when the other members weren’t available to get together. I learned enough about each instrument to be able to record entire songs on my own. Over-dubbing and multi-tracking became a few of my favorite terms. I recorded hundreds of hours of music on that machine before graduating into the digital world of ProTools. Years of approaching music from a solo stand-point allowed me to streamline the creative and technical processes involved with writing and recording. I didn’t like to spend too much time on one song because I constantly had new ideas, so I found myself recording entire songs from scratch in a few days or less. At the age of 34 (2009) I had the idea for “A New Song Every Day.” I had never heard of anyone doing anything like this, nor did I take the time to research whether anyone had attempted this or not. At the time it just didn’t matter. This seemed like the obvious next step for my progression, and it became one of the best, most challenging, and most rewarding experiences of my life."

THE PROJECT: "My goal with this project was to challenge and improve my abilities as a songwriter, a producer, a studio musician, and an audio engineer. Additionally, I did all of the marketing, web development, and I worked a part-time job, which meant that I usually had about 4-8 hours each day to devote to this project. 95% of these songs were written completely from scratch each day, and each song has roughly 15-25 individual tracks. I compiled each week (7 songs) into “albums” that had their own album title, artwork, theme, and style of music. Each day I tried to approach the songwriting process as though the best song I could create had yet to be written. Every recording session was streamed ‘live’ on U-Stream, and those that were on the mailing list received an email every evening with the newest song. All songs were recorded at my highly functional, yet relatively modest home-studio, ThreeByNine. I never missed a midnight deadline in 366 consecutive days. I love endurance events, and I’ve competed in marathons, 100-mile bike races, and triathlons. However, this “musical marathon” was a full year long, which means I had to persevere in the midst of no days off (including holidays and weekends), other endurance competitions (I drove to Wichita Falls, TX at 2am to compete in a bike race, then came back at 4pm to write/record a new song), a trip to the ER with extreme bronchitis, and much more. Every day of this process was documented daily in my BLOG."

Guest Musicians Include...

(View the DOWNLOADS page to see which songs feature which artist.)

 

Ryan Otto

 

 

Brandon Steach

 

 

Adam & Anne Smith

 

 

Thiago Silva

 

 

Brandon Arnold

 

 

Sam Reidland

 

 

Creating Album Covers...

Project Task List...

"This is a photo of my wife, Carly and I dressed as Richie and Margot Tenenbaum just before I competed in a Halloween triathlon in Keller, Texas (in full costume). Carly is a very talented photographer, photo re-toucher, and graphic designer. When I brought this music project idea to her she was not only understanding but also very supportive. (This photo is testament to her love for me...she didn't even like the movie The Royal Tenenbaum's.) We came up with a fun process, and together we co-created all of the album cover designs for this project. Once I had decided on the theme and album title for the following week's music I would give her a few general ideas, and she would work her magic. Thanks, Carly!" -Matthew

Daily Reminders...

Click to View Photos...

All Content Copyright 2014 Freehand Productions, LLC - 817.999.4116 - email@matthewotto.com

Filmmakers, Producers, Directors, and Ad Agencies should view the Film Scoring page to learn more.